New Zealand massacre: shooter meant to continue attack, says PM

New Zealand Charges Main Shooter in Mosque Attack with Murder

Brenton Harrison Tarrant has appeared in court

The 28-year-old main suspect in mass shootings at two New Zealand mosques on Friday that killed 49 people and injured dozens was produced in court a day after the attacks.

Labelling the attack as an act of terrorism, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has vowed to reform the country's gun laws.

Some of the guns appear to have been modified to make them more deadly, she said, adding that a ban on semi-automatic weapons would be considered. - AP A woman paying her respects to the victims of the attack at a makeshift memorial near the Masjid Al Noor mosque, Saturday, March 16, 2019, Christchurch, New Zealand.

The hospital also confirmed 39 people are still receiving treatment, with 11 of them in intensive care.

New South Wales state Police Commissioner Mick Fuller said his officers are investigating to help New Zealand police and to ensure the safety of residents in the Australian state where suspect Brenton Tarrant is from. Ardern said the country's gun laws will change as a result of the carnage, but she did not specify how.

Two other people have been apprehended and are being questioned about what role, if any, they had in the attacks.

He live-streamed footage of him going room-to-room, victim to victim, shooting people from close range as they struggled to crawl away.

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern described the tragedy as a "terrorist attack" and noted numerous victims could be migrants or refugees.

Security at London mosques was hiked up yesterday after the New Zealand attacker said he was inspired by events in the United Kingdom and wanted Muslim London mayor Sadiq Kahn dead. This is a partial transcription of those press conferences in which she touches on her country's diversity, sending condolences to victims and their families and communities.

"There is one charge of murder brought at the moment, it is reasonable to assume that there will be others", said Judge Paul Kellar.

Turkey urges Saudi Arabia to name suspects on trial for Khashoggi's murder
The news came as Turkey slammed attempts by Saudi Arabia to shut down an global investigation into the journalist's killing. The red notices were issued on 1 March at the request of the Istanbul Prosecutor's Office, the Turkish media specified.

"I live in New Zealand because the first time I came here in 2011, I found a place that was heaven on earth and I made a decision to bring my family to live here in peace, away from all the troubles", a Palestinian man said. At least two Jordanian citizens were killed and five others wounded in the shootings, the country's Foreign Ministry said.

In 2014, police estimated there were up to 1.2 million legal firearms in civilian ownership, or around one for every four members of the public - twice the per capita number of guns in Australia.

The test was due to start at Hagley Oval in Christchurch on Saturday but the Bangladesh team left New Zealand less than 24 hours after the shooting and about an hour after the initial scheduled start time.

Tarrant, charged with one count of murder, will remain in custody until his next court appearance on April 5.

When speaking to reporters later, Aziz said he wasn't the one that deserves credit for his quick thinking.

Condemning the terror strike, Ardern had described it as a "terror attack" and said it "appears to have been well planned". The U.S. stands by New Zealand for anything we can do.

Numerous victims hailed from around the world.

Aziz said: "He gets into his vehicle and I just got the gun and threw it on his window like an arrow and blasted his window".

Ansun Zhong, owner of Chong's Chinese restaurant in Christchurch City Central, said the shooting greatly affected people's life in Christchurch.

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